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‘Looking good, looking correct?’ 

By

Annabel Page

Purple Haze - Jimi HendrixPurple Haze - Jimi HendrixPurple Haze - Jimi Hendrix

Purple Haze - Jimi Hendrix

Purple Haze - Jimi Hendrix

Purple Haze - Jimi Hendrix

Purple Haze - Jimi Hendrix

Purple Haze - Jimi Hendrix

Purple Haze - Jimi Hendrix



When I draw, paint or create anything I am acutely aware of what I call the ‘correctness’ of a work. It is major consideration in the back of my mind because it is my chance to create a relationship with the onlooker. The ‘correctness’ is all about making the viewer comfortable and happy with what comes into his vision when he gazes upon the work. It’s about his mind telling him that ‘all is well’ - every aspect of the picture sits perfectly within it’s surroundings, there are no ‘jarring’ aspects which scream awkwardly out. If there are, then the ‘correctness’ has been lost and in my opinion, the painting has lost it’s way.

I like my viewer’s eyes and brain to do the work. I want their brain to take responsibility for what they are seeing. I try to allow them to ‘join up the dots’.....

Degas said, ‘Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.’

A hint or suggestive mark on the canvas can go along way to allowing the viewer to take an active role in the whole experience. In fact it becomes a joint experience between the artist and the viewer - a shared response, a personal relationship, an intimate involvement. And as such this partnership leads the viewer to take ownership of the piece in front of him; His ‘taking part’ gives him permission to like it or not. Love it or hate it. He is moved one way or another. He can criticize it or eulogize about it. He can scream at it or throw his arms around it and cherish it. It becomes his very own visual property.

David Hockney said, ‘No matter what the illusion created, it is a flat canvas and it has to be organized into shapes...’

Let this organization be a joint venture.....

My belief is it should be an artist’s challenge to take the viewer by the hand and invite them to take responsibility for their own feelings and opinions. Not only will this be memorable and refreshing, it will inevitably lead to an intimate and personal self journey of discovery.